• 17Jul

    Today’s post in the series “What Are Your Tips for Staying Hydrated?” was contributed by Jess Parsons-White, GMM Senior VP.

    The summer heat is sweltering and without proper hydration you might find yourself feeling lethargic, cramping, or even dizzy. For some, it is an easy solution of drinking more water, but for those on the move or who may not enjoy guzzling a gallon of cool refreshing water, staying hydrated in the heat can be a challenge.

    Luckily, our Open Hand Wellness Committee has put together a quick fact sheet for staying hydrated on go, as well as a few suggestions for how to “rethink your drink” by adding flavorful infusions to your water bottle.

    Tip one: Invest in a good water bottle! Look for a BPA-free container that is easy to fill and to drink out of while driving or exercising. The easier it is to use the more you’ll drink!

    Tip two: Before hitting the road fill your water bottle up with cold water, and when it’s empty, make it a priority to find a water fountain or rest stop where you can safely replenish. Our own Good Measure Meals drivers struggled getting their daily dose of H2O; but recognizing the need, our Wellness Committee partnered with Kaiser to distribute new water bottles to all the drivers. Now there is a line at the filtered water dispenser every morning!

    Joe HydrationDonny Hydration

    Tip three: Don’t be afraid to add unique flavor combinations to your pitcher or glass. Fresh Herbs and fruits can be combined to add an exciting twist to your drink! Just throw a handful of each into a pitcher and them strain out after an hour.
    • Looking for a calming classic? Try Cucumber Mint.
    • For a zesty combo, try Pineapple Parsley.
    • Maybe you’re into a sweeter treat? Strawberry Basil is a personal favorite.
    • Not convinced yet? Start with a few slices of Lemons, Limes, and Oranges for a classic citrus zing!

    **Now check out a quick demonstration for how to infuse water by our Spring Dietetic Intern, Frances Ennis! And for even MORE info, check out Jess’ previous post about the benefits of good hydration.**

  • 12Jun

    Today’s blog post in the series, “What are your favorite summer fruits and veggies?” was contributed by Callie O’Steen, Good Measure Meals Community Registered Dietitian

    callieosteenWhen I think of summer, my mouth waters – Literally!

    So many in-season, fresh fruits and vegetables! And we’re lucky here in the South because we produce some pretty tasty produce. Let’s get to know some of our Georgia-grown (and some of my personal favorites) a little better, shall we?

    What is the state fruit of Georgia?

    So this is the easiest question on earth. And if you got it wrong… I’m just going to assume you moved here from the moon.

    peaches on treesThe answer, for our moon-peeps: Peaches! Not only do they provide fiber for digestive regulation, they’re also full of great vitamins and minerals. That rich, orange color in peaches contains Beta-carotene, a derivative of Vitamin A, which protect cells from harm. Peaches are also a good source of Potassium, which can counteract the effects of Sodium!

    Peaches are in season between June and August so they may also cost less in these months because of the higher supply. Plus they’re outrageously, naturally, and addictively sweet! Such a fun summer treat!

    Ready for another question? This one’s a little harder…

    We learned that Peaches are the state fruit of Georgia but what is the state vegetable?
    (Hint: it, too, is sweet…)

    vidalia onionIf you guessed Vidalia onions, you are right! They are only grown in a very specific region of South Georgia and are known for their sweetness. They are grown in low-sulfur soil, so this means no tears when you cut into them! And similar to our peaches, Vidalia onions contain potassium as well.

    So what happens when you combine these Georgia produce stars? “Simply Southern Salad!”

    Georgia Peach and Vidalia Onion Salad with White Balsamic Vinaigrette
    Recipe sourced from Chef Klaskala:
    Ingredients
    • 4 fresh peaches, preferably free stone
    • ¼ cup Vidalia onions, thinly sliced
    • 1 teaspoon fresh mint, roughly torn
    • 1½ tablespoons grapeseed oil
    • 2 teaspoons white balsamic vinegar
    • Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste
    • 1 cup mixed field greens

    Instructions:
    Cut the peaches in half, remove stone, and cut into thick wedges. In a medium bowl, combine the peaches, onions and mint. Add grapeseed oil and white balsamic vinegar. Season with salt and
    pepper and gently toss.
    To serve:
    Divide peach, onion and mint salad evenly between 8 serving plates. Toss field greens in bowl with the dressing that remains and clings to the bowl. Scatter field greens on plates and serve.

  • 10Apr

    Have you been tuning in to our Atlanta and Company segments the last couple of weeks?

    Rachel Stroud, our GMM Registered Dietitian and Community Wellness Rep, has been joining host Rashan Ali to discuss some really important keys to weight-loss success. She will continue this series each week for the next few weeks, so make sure to tune in at 12:30 each Wednesday for some informed discussion (and a special FLASH SALE discount!!).

    photo 1

    Hopefully you’ve already made the pledge to yourself to Commit to Lean in 2014 and are on your way toward meeting your health goals this year. If you are, you know that the process of re-learning portion control and creating those engrained healthy habits takes a while.

    The complicated part is that so many diets out there make weight loss about less, less, less. Less calories, less food equals MORE WEIGHT LOSS.

    But for real weight loss that lasts, we need to replace the idea of “less” with the concept of balance and of sustainability. Repeat that to yourself: balance and sustainability. Balance and sustainability.

    rachel scary childhood meals

    Energy Balance is the simplest equation we have for achieving weight loss or weight maintenance. Our body takes in energy through food and beverages, and we put energy out through basic survival, activities of daily life, and planned exercise. If we want to lose weight, we have to put out more energy than we’re taking in.

    The calories you personally need each day for basic survival is called your Basil Metabolic Rate. It’s the number of calories your body need to function if you simply laid in bed all day. Those calories are the energy necessary for your heart to pump, your lungs to expand, and your lean muscles to be fueled.

    Now, IF, in the name of quick weight loss, you eat LESS than your body’s Basil Metabolic Rate, your body will enter “Starvation Mode.” Starvation mode changes the way the body processes nutrients so it stores our fat (gasp!) and breaks down muscle for the energy it needs instead.

    Now here’s the real kicker: fueling our muscles with oxygen and energy is a significant part of our metabolic rate, so let’s say your body breaks down muscle to fuel itself during your diet regimen of drastic calorie-cutting. In the process, you’ve lessened the amount of calories your body needs in a day. This means that instead of functioning at your normal (for example) 1700 calories necessary per day, your body has dropped and acclamated to functioning on (for example) 1000 calories per day.

    Now let’s say you go back to consuming the amount of calories you used to at your former Basil Metabolic Rate, or what you used to consider “normal” before severely cutting your calories. At that point it is going to be harder to continue to lose weight and to keep the weight you have lost off, because during the “starvation mode” period you have decreased your metabolism by decreasing your muscle mass.

    Make sense?

    The moral of the story is: the only way to increase your metabolism (so that you can actually burn away that FAT) is to build more muscle. This raises your metabolism and the amount of calories you burn in a day, despite your physical activity. Very low calorie diets shoot down your metabolism and cause you to lose muscle.

    Unless you want to continue cutting away calories and restricting your access to food for the rest of your life, losing weight the healthy and sustainable way means keeping your muscle and your metabolism and burning away your fat with a balance of nutrition and calorie intake that works for your exercise level and Basal Metabolic needs.

    Ever heard a weight loss plan tell you that you need to eat to lose weight? We just did.

    Tune in each week at 12:30 p.m. on Atlanta and Company to hear the discussion continue with Rachel and Rashan about healthy weight loss.

    And if you’re curious about how many calories YOU need per day, fill out your info in the Calorie Calculator tool at the bottom of the homepage of our website, or schedule a Med Gem appointment with one of our dietitians to find out your exact Basal Metabolic Rate!

    photo 7

  • 27Mar

    Today’s post is contributed by GMM Community Nutrition Educator/Culinary Specialist, Ashley Van Cise.

    Adding a variety of color to my plate is one way that I keep myself on a healthy eating track. By choosing color, I know I’m eating an assortment of vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals.

    Pictured here are foods that I’ve made at home, highlighting some of my attempts to add color to my own plate. I’ve called out the phytochemicals that correlate to the color and the potential health benefits of each one.

    cherry tomato and basil pasta salad
    Cherry Tomato and Basil Pasta Salad – check out the bright red and yellow tomatoes. These tomatoes have concentrated amounts of lycopene which have been studied for their ability to protect against heart disease and cancer.

    blueberry oat
    Blueberry Oat Bran Muffins – focus your eye on the blueberries in these muffins. Their blue/purple color comes from a type of flavonoid called anthocyanins, which can act like antioxidants, reduce inflammation and combat against cancer cells.

    Black Bean Chili with Sweet Potatoes and Swiss Chard
    Black Bean Chili with Sweet Potatoes and Swiss Chard – Notice the orange going on here. Sweet potatoes are high in beta carotene which is a type of carotenoid that may protect against heart disease. The beans also contain flavonoids that can decrease inflammation and protect against heart disease, stroke and cancer.

    Roasted BBQ Chicken, Quinoa Pilaf and Arugula Salad with Radish and Carrots
    Roasted BBQ Chicken, Quinoa Pilaf and Arugula Salad with Radish and Carrots – There are a several healthy things going on in this picture. First, let me highlight the arugula which contains lutein, a type of carotenoid that can work to maintain healthy vision and protect eyes from cataracts and macular degeneration. Also notice the red radish, these contain anthocyanins, which I mentioned when discussing the blueberries found in the Oat Bran Muffins.

    Grilled Vegetables topped with Fresh Basil
    Grilled Vegetables topped with Fresh Basil – Check out those onions. Even though onions are white, they are high in a flavonoid called quercetin which works as an antioxidant to decrease inflammation and protect the body against heart disease, stroke and certain types of cancer.

    The way phytochemicals work and the optimum amounts for consuming are still being researched. Your goals should be to incorporate 5-9 servings of colorful fruits and veggies daily.

    What is the most colorful food on your plate today?

  • 10Mar

    Today’s post is contributed by GMM Registered Dietitian and Community Wellness Rep, Rachel Stroud

    It is safe to say that cooking is the most therapeutic thing in the world to me. Except for possibly grocery shopping.

    rachel with juiceAfter a long day of working, juggling schedules, clients, and partners – my mind racing every which way at any possible moment – I ache for my kitchen. Everything feels still there. The colors of fresh fruits and veggies. The sound of sizzling oil in a pan. The feeling of running a sharp knife through an onion and tossing it into a hot pan, the accumulating scent of savory flavor filling the kitchen air. It’s like a warm cozy blanket for my senses.

    I’d love to tell you that I spend hours each night standing over the stove, tossing spices and presenting beautiful meals to my fiancée and closest friends. But let’s be honest, I don’t.
    It might happen once every couple weeks. Twice on a good week.

    Most of the time, I’m dashing into the house, whipping open the refrigerator and hoping that some reheatable gourmet meal is magically waiting for me to toss it in the microwave and save me from having to figure out something quick, healthy, and low maintenance to make in 2 minutes.
    (Side note: Good Measure Meals is perfect in those sorts of situations. See what I did there??)

    But on weeks where I don’t have GMM to be my saving-grace-magic-dinner-fairy, my go-to meals are what I call “bowls,” or at least that’s what they have been dubbed by those I most commonly feed.

    These “bowls” are healthy meals I can whip up in about 10-20 minutes, toss in a bowl, and call it a night. Here’s how the Bowl magic happens:

    1) Starch – Pick a starch, any starch. Rice, quinoa, cous cous, faro, and potatoes are my most frequent go-to’s. My ideal situation is when I happen to make a grain earlier in the week and have the forethought to make a double batch so that I have some handy leftovers.

    2) Protein – Chicken, lean beef, ground turkey, or my very favorite: a poached egg with runny yolk. If you’re low on meat/eggs, go for quinoa, our favorite handy-dandy grain-like starch that contains all your essential amino acids. Or, plop a hefty spoonful of your favorite beans on top. The protein options are plentiful. And don’t forget about cheese! Let’s be honest, cheese makes everything better. Just make sure to think about using cheese as a seasoning rather than a main attraction to keep those portion sizes in check.

    3) Veggie – Veggies, galore! Toss them in a pan with oil to sauté, or spread them on parchment in a 400 degree oven for that roasted flavor. Shoot for a couple colors in your bowl. In a pinch, salsa will work for some of those veggie effects, but opt for freshly prepared when you can. Kale, spinach, onions, peppers, brussels sprouts, tomatoes, broccoli, and avocado are my mainstays.

    4) MISC – sometimes I like toasted nuts or herbs in my bowl as well for a zing. Lest you think I plan these things out with great forethought, typically I just grab whatever I have leftover or is about to spoil: garlic, parsley, cilantro, rosemary, and thyme give a little extra flavor and look like the finishing touch on your mound of delicious and nutritious bowl ingredients.

    Voila! Did you know healthy could be that easy? AND tasty?! “Enjoy the Taste of Eating Right” is the 2014 theme for National Nutrition Month this March (that’s now!). Healthy meals should taste delicious, and the good news is that you don’t have to take hours of slaving over a stove to prepare them (especially when you order GMM!).

    Some of my go-to bowl combinations are:
    • Quinoa (or brown rice), black beans, feta cheese, salsa, avocado
    • Quinoa, onion, sweet potato, kale, pesto, toasted pecans, avocado, goat cheese (compliments of my own rendition of this Real Simple recipe)
    • Roasted Yukon Gold Potatoes, kale, white cheddar, scrambeled eggs, cherry tomatoes, parsley
    • Faro, brussel sprouts, dried cranberries, toasted pecans, dash of balsamic vinegar & maple syrup, avocado, topped with a poached egg (my spin on this Cookie&Kate recipe)

    Bowl1

    Farro, Brussel Sprouts, Cranberries, Avocado, toasted Pecans, Goat Cheese

    Bowl2

    Quinoa, Turkey Sausage, Kale, Cherry Tomatoes, and Avocado topped with a Poached Egg

    Bowl3

    Roasted Yukon Gold & Sweet Potatoes, Kale, Avocado, and White Cheddar topped with a Poached Egg

    Bowl4

    Roasted Yukon Gold Potatos, scrambled Eggs, Spinach, Green Onions, Cherry Tomatoes, Parsley

  • 28Feb

    Today’s post contributed by GMM Registered Dietitian and Community Wellness Representative, Rachel Stroud

    You know that age-old black and white food label that seems to just blend right into the side of every box in the grocery store? Ever struggled to know what on earth you were supposed to be looking at on it?

    Well there may be some changes on the horizon.

    Yesterday, First Lady Michelle Obama and the FDA unveiled their proposed edits for those nutrition labels that have looked the same on every packaged food we’ve purchased since the 1990’s.

    The new design will require companies to structure their nutrition facts off of serving sizes based on amounts that are more realistic for what the average buyer consumes.

    For example, most of us know by now that the “serving size” on the back of a pint of ice cream is listed as 1/2 cup per serving.

    Who actually only eats 1/2 cup of ice cream?! Not me!

    Photo via cnn.com

    Photo via cnn.com.

    With the new labeling system, ice cream, for example, will now be based on a 1-cup serving size. Not because this is the amount we should all be eating, but because it more accurately reflects the amount we are already eating, giving a more truthfully picture of the nutrition facts we’re consuming with a “normal-sized” portion.

    Also under the new system, the Daily Value for Sodium will be based on 2300mg/day rather than 2400mg/day. There will also be a new line included for Added Sugars, under the Carbohydrates category. And say goodbye to “Calories From Fat,” since we will now be paying closer attention to the types of fat, rather than simply the amount.

    For 90 days, the public has a chance to comment on these proposed changes.

    So – what do you think about the food labels makeover?

    Would this make label-reading easier or more accessible to you? Or would you like to go back to thinking there are only 270 calories in that heaping “1/2 cup” of ice cream?

    Let’s discuss. Leave your comments on the post on our Facebook Page!

  • 10Dec

    Contributed by GMM Health Promotions Intern, Emily Mooney

    dsc_0134-51Let me introduce you to Ashley Ritchie, one of the brains behind Good Measure Meals’s delicious and healthy creations. 

    Ashley grew up in a small town outside of Columbus, Ohio. As a kid, Ashley’s mom regularly cooked healthy meals and used their family’s garden to inspire her in the kitchen. When Ashley left home for college, she learned that the college norm of eating out didn’t agree with her body. She realized nutrition has a big impact on how you feel, and a bad diet can negatively impact your life in more ways than one. Ashley decided then and there that she wanted to study Dietetics and make a difference in other people’s lives through healthy eating. 

    Ashley earned her B.S. degree in Nutrition from the University of Tennessee-Knoxville, and completed her Dietetic Internship at Virginia Tech in Arlington, Virginia. Yet, what sets Ashley apart is not her dietetics education, but her extensive culinary training. Ashley is a proud graduate of the National Gourmet Institute of Health and Culinary Arts in New York, a unique culinary school that places a strong emphasis on health and alternative cooking methods.

    It is this health-conscious culinaryAshley Ritchie, RD, talks about how to prepare leeks. training that continues to inspire and influence Ashley’s meal development strategies and ideas. At Good Measure Meals, Ashley is an important component of the Menu Development Team, which consists of three dietitians and two chefs. Together, they launch two new menus per year: a fall-winter menu and spring-summer set of options. The menu development process involves analyzing customer feedback from past meals, deciding which meals to bring back, nutrition analysis, and creating new recipes for each season. In addition to her work as a recipe developer, Ashley teaches cooking classes, as well as other nutrition classes and events for Good Measure Meals. She also manages the Good Measure Meals catering department.

    Achieve your goals with enthusiasm and excitement!Through her work for Good Measure Meals, and as a personal goal in life, Ashley hopes to inspire others to spend more time in their kitchens! She urges others to cook more than they normally do, whether that means preparing one dinner a week or preparing healthy lunches to eat at the office all week long. Motivating others to cook more introduces the use of fresh ingredients into their diet, as well as prompts them to think about using healthy substitutions for excess salt, butter, and heavy cream – the thing Good Measure Meals does best, thanks to her input! Ashley hopes to use her love of teaching and cooking to positively impact the lives of others. 

     

    Watch Ashley on Atlanta & Company tomorrow morning (12/11) at 11am to learn some healthy holiday tips!

    Emily Mooney is a native of Lexington, Kentucky. She attended Elon University in Elon, North Carolina where she earned a Bachelor’s degree in English and a minor in Dance. Following her graduation last year, she moved to Atlanta, Georgia where she now works as a legal assistant at a small firm in Midtown. Emily is currently in the process of preparing to apply to graduate school to study Nutrition and ultimately become a registered dietitian. She has joined forces with Good Measure Meals in the interim to learn as much as she can from this fabulous team of GMM registered dietitians.

  • 19Nov

    Contributed by GMM Health Promotion Intern, Emily Mooney.

    Meet Callie O’Steen.
    CallieOSteen_3On the surface, she’s just like any young professional: she enjoys taking spin classes, running on the perfect fall day, and indulging at Red Pepper Taqueria. But, take a closer look and you’ll see Callie is making big waves in Atlanta’s health scene.

    Originally from Alabama, Callie grew up with an immense love of food (what else?!). She eventually attended the University of Alabama where she earned her B.S. in Dietetics, and she continued on to earn a Master’s in Public Health from Emory University. Throughout her schooling, Callie knew she wanted to do community-based nutrition work and help as many people gain healthy food access as she could. Thus, Open Hand and its partner, Good Measure Meals, seemed like the perfect place for her to establish her roots as a Registered Dietitian. Callie loves that 100% of Good Measure’s net proceeds go to Open Hand, and enjoys seeing the difference she’s making every day.

    As a Registered Dietitian for Open Hand, Callie gets to exercise her creative juices as she works to launch and sustain nutrition education classes in the community.  In addition to designing and implementing educational programming, Callie regularly visits HIV clinics, senior living centers, and the like to provide medical nutrition therapy. She offers counseling to those with HIV, diabetes, and heart disease in an effort to help them devise ways to stay healthy while keeping in consideration their health conditions. In a similar way, Callie assists with the Senior Market Basket Program. Through this program, she strives to provide fresh fruits and vegetables and nutrition educational materials to at-risk clients whose nutritional needs are not being met, yet do not qualify them for direct Open Hand assistance.

    Amidst all of her work as a dietitian, Callie hopes to instill in her clients that she is just like everybody else in terms of health challenges – she’s had to modify her own lifestyle to incorporate more fruits and vegetables in her diet and increase her physical activity. Callie strives to correct the misconception that all registered dietitians only eat celery and lettuce.  RD’s enjoy good food too! She hopes to be relatable and trustworthy above all else, striving to take a personal interest in every client. Most importantly, she strives to be a compassionate health resource for others, and hopes to put the power of better health in the individuals themselves.

    **Tune in to Channel 11 tomorrow morning at 11 a.m. to see Callie appear on Atlanta & Company! She will be giving tips for how to cook with seasonal spices AND giving out a special FLASH SALE discount.**

    DSC01316

    Callie O’Steen, second from right, participates in a special Firefighter Fitness LLC bootcamp with some fellow GMM team members.

    Emily Mooney is a native of Lexington, Kentucky. She attended Elon University in Elon, North Carolina where she earned a Bachelor’s degree in English and a minor in Dance. Following her graduation last year, she moved to Atlanta, Georgia where she now works as a legal assistant at a small firm in Midtown. Emily is currently in the process of preparing to apply to graduate school to study Nutrition and ultimately become a registered dietitian. She has joined forces with Good Measure Meals in the interim to learn as much as she can from this fabulous team of GMM registered dietitians.

  • 05Nov

    DSC_1273_croppedPerhaps it was her long, sunrise runs along Lake Michigan that inspired Sarah Shanahan to pursue a degree in exercise and nutrition. Well that, and her love of good food.

    Originally from Atlanta, Sarah started baking with her mother when she was practically still a toddler, and the memory of her parents cooking from their backyard garden of fresh corn and tomatoes has certainly stuck with her through the years (even though she apparently did not inherit their green thumb).

    Sarah first started her career pursuing a nursing degree from the Medical College of Georgia. But when she moved up to Chicago to work at a non-profit organization as a nurse case manager, she unexpectedly fell in love with running.

    As she was logging miles upon miles along Lake Michigan while training for her first marathon, Sarah quickly realized that she didn’t actually know how best to fuel and hydrate her body to make it perform at its maximum potential. She started doing some basic nutrition and exercise research until the epiphany struck: exercise and nutrition was her niche.

    The decision to move to New York City to pursue a Master’s degree in Nutrition Education from Teachers College at Columbia University was an easy one for Sarah. She plunged into the field at a medical/fitness hybrid company, where she ultimately became Director of Nutritional Services.

    Sarah_Atlanta AcademyHaving recently moved back to Atlanta, Sarah now works to build and strengthen partnerships with Atlanta’s corporate and medical communities for Good Measure Meals as a Community Wellness Representative. She develops and presents nutrition and wellness programming for GMM’s corporate partners, providing the Atlanta area with a credible and reliable health resource.

    And as in New York City, Sarah also works one-on-one with GMM clients, helping them reach their goals through individual nutrition counseling and support. Her specialties are weight and chronic disease management, sports nutrition, and behavior modification.

    Sarah hopes to give her clients a “new way to look at the basics” of diet and exercise.

    “I am a realist,” she says. “I want everyone to have a good relationship with food, and be able to enjoy fueling their bodies for what they need to do.”

    After all, at the core, she’s a lover of high-quality food who you’ll find active and outdoors more often than not, running, walking, doing random push-ups, or taking a break to relax on the porch.

    Sarah snaps a picture after running a 16K road race from Paris to Versailles

    Sarah snaps a picture after running a 16K road race from Paris to Versailles

    Sarah and her dad at the GA400 cycling race this summer.

    Sarah and her dad at the GA400 cycling race this summer.

  • 22Oct

    Contributed by GMM Health Promotion Intern, Emily Mooney.

    Joy GoetzLet me introduce Joy Goetz, a garden guru, and one of Open Hand’s and Good Measure Meals’ Community Health Dietitians.

    Born in Miami-Dade County, Florida, Joy grew up as a racial minority in a predominantly Latin American culture. She attended Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia where she earned a Bachelor’s degree in Health Promotion. She continued her education at the University of Georgia where she earned a Master’s degree in Nutrition.

    At Open Hand, Joy serves as a link between Open Hand and the community it serves. She regularly implements and assists with communal nutrition programs and provides routine nutrition education to Atlantans of lower economic status. Pulling from her experiences as a minority growing up, Joy can relate to the families and community members with whom she works on a daily basis. She tries to do her best to meet people where they are on their respective health journeys. As a Community Health Dietitian, she strives to assist people with challenge of making quick, healthy meals on a budget.

    Joy_GoetzAdditionally, Joy acts as a representative for the local food system, regularly working alongside the Atlanta Local Food Initiative and Georgia Organics to spread awareness about local economies and bridge the gap between Georgia’s rural and urban communities. Joy is also Open Hand’s Resident Garden Expert, offering advice and consultation services in gardening to the greater Atlanta community. She uses gardening to teach people from where food comes; a visual representation of food’s journey from land to table.

    In general, Joy immensely enjoys being out in the community as part of her job, and loves interacting with people from all walks of life. She strives to be the best teacher possible, working to establish health literacy in Atlanta. Most importantly, Joy enjoys helping those with whom she works to reach their “ahha” moments, and meet their respective health goals.

    When she’s not working for Open Hand, Joy enjoys practicing acroyoga and aerial dance, spending time with friends and family, experimenting in the kitchen, playing with her dog, and, of course, gardening in her front yard.

    ***TOMORROW, Joy will be live on air on Atlanta & Company, promoting Good Measure Meals as part of the Northside Hospital New Start Weight Smart Challenge. Tune in to hear her talk about Eating Real and to catch our weekly FLASH SALE!***

    joy i eat real salad

    Emily Mooney is a native of Lexington, Kentucky. She attended Elon University in Elon, North Carolina where she earned a Bachelor’s degree in English and a minor in Dance. Following her graduation last year, she moved to Atlanta, Georgia where she now works as a legal assistant at a small firm in Midtown. Emily is currently in the process of preparing to apply to graduate school to study Nutrition and ultimately become a registered dietitian. She has joined forces with Good Measure Meals in the interim to learn as much as she can from this fabulous team of GMM registered dietitians.