• 22May

    Today’s Blog Post in the “What is Your Favorite Warm-Weather Form of Exercise” Series was contributed by GMM Business Development Representative, David Rogers.

    My favorite warm-weather exercise is either outdoor walking or bike riding. I grew up doing these activities with my parents and siblings after dinner to help us after our meals to promote good health, family time and better sleep.

    photo 2_2These days, I am very fortunate to live in a great walking and biking neighborhood. The rolling landscape of my route provides not only moderate resistance for raising my heart rate, but also a visually beautiful area to help reduce stress. Plus, it’s always nice to catch the smell of the flowers just before you need a burst of energy to stride up a hill (and build some muscle!).

    It’s also just nice to be able to chat with and catch up with any of the neighbors that might be out along the way, and to even bring my dog along for the walk. Having a community network is proven to be a key to good health and happiness, so taking a walk or bike ride around the neighborhood and speaking with the neighbors checks two health-promoting boxes at once!

    photo 1To mix things up, my town has also created a 5-mile trail system that has pedestrian- and bike-friendly lanes. I often step out of my usual routine and even enlist my friends and family to join me for a 30-45 minute trek along these trails. Most communities offer a similar set-up or have local parks nearby with wellness challenge stations to help improve your strength, flexibility, and stamina, so I usually look for these for an added challenge along the way.

    For me, exercising during the warm summer months is all about having the right shoes, bringing along proper hydration, and most importantly having good company to encourage me to get outside to keep promoting my good health and reduce my stress.

  • 14May

    Today’s Blog Post in the “What is Your Favorite Warm-Weather Form of Exercise” Series was contributed by GMM Registered Dietitian, Callie O’Steen.

    callieosteenIs it just me, or did we just get hit with summertime here in Atlanta?? Warm weather days are definitely upon us! Bring on the sunshine (no sunscreen, because this pale girl needs a tan!) — alright, alright, maybe I will compromise and put on SPF 15 so my dermatologist doesn’t hate me.

    I don’t know about you, but warm weather motivates me to be healthier. I run more, go on longer bike rides, (eat more ice cream), and I eat fresher, too!

    But one of my favorite warm-weather activities is walking. You get in some good physical activity, and you don’t come away completely drenched in sweat. Walking is also a great way to start exercising if it’s been a while since that gym card’s been swiped - and walking definitely isn’t as intimidating as that hot yoga-pilates-spin-boot camp class they offer at the gym.

    Convinced yet? If not….

    Did you know that walking can help reduce your risk of diabetes, heart disease, dementia, and depression?! Whoa now – time to lace up those tennis shoes!!

    If you like to walk (yay!) and talk (yay!) about nutrition (DOUBLE YAY!) come join us for our “Walks and Talks with an RD on the Beltline!” Our registered dietitians (RDs) host weekly walks along the beautiful Atlanta Beltline, and we discuss any questions or topics that may be on your mind. So come out and ask us questions, we love chatting!

    Here are some meeting locations where you can find us on a weekly basis. We hope to see you at a Walk soon!

    Piedmont Park (Park Tavern parking lot), 1014 Monroe Drive, Atlanta, GA, 30306: Wednesdays at 5:30pm with RD Callie

    Washington Park (Tennis Center), 1125 Lena St., Atlanta, GA, 30314: Thursdays at 7:30am with RD Jamie

    Eastside Trail Extension (H. Haper Station), 904 Memorial Dr SE, Atlanta, GA, 30316: Thursdays at 5:30pm with RD Kristi

    Callie O'Steen, left, leads a crew on a Beltline "Walk and Talk with an RD."

    Callie O’Steen, left, leads a crew on a Beltline “Walk and Talk with an RD.”

  • 08May

    Summer is right around the corner, and the hot weather has already started rolling in! Our town isn’t called “Hotlanta” for nothing, so we asked our staff members: “What is your favorite way to exercise in the heat?”
    harmony

    Over the next few weeks we’ll share their responses. We hope you find some motivation to get out and move around, too!

    Today’s post is contributed by GMM Customer Service Representative, Harmony Blackwell.

     

    My favorite way to exercise in the summer is to swim.
    It gives me a chance to move my whole body while having fun and staying cool. The weightlessness that I experience in the water enables me to do various exercises that I cannot do as easily out of the water.

    Consistent swimming tones the body, improves cardiovascular health, and lengthens the muscles, all without breaking down the body. In fact, swimming is often used as a method of therapy and rehabilitation for athletes who have been injured while participating in high-impact sports.

    fun noodle

    Swimming is also good for relaxation and clearing of the mind. I LOVE floating on those fun noodles you see at the pool. First of all there’s a knack to balancing along the length of the noodle with my legs crossed. Once I’ve got the perfect position, I use my arms to snake across the water as I look up in the sky making stories up based on the various cloud formations that flow through the air. There’s something about floating and staring up into the expanse of the sky that makes you feel connected to the Earth.

    Looks like this guy enjoys floating with a fun noodle, too ;)

    My other favorite thing about being in the water is playing volleyball! You get a serious workout between the jumping and diving for the ball. Not to mention the laughter that constantly happens during the game!

    And last, but not least, I LOVE the ocean! Swimming with sea life is one of the most awesome experiences! It taps me into an whole separate world of life, and even teaches me how to “go with the flow.” Not to mention that the salt water and sand are great cleansers and exfoliators for your skin.

    running into ocean

    Since January of this year, I’ve decided to make a “Commit to Lean”-style life change: Eating right with the help of Good Measure Meals, doing a consistent weekly workout, and making sure I’m drinking the proper amount of water.

    And now that it’s already halfway through the year, and I’ve been keeping at my goals, I’m ready for bikini season!

    What about you, what is your favorite hot-weather workout?

  • 10Apr

    Have you been tuning in to our Atlanta and Company segments the last couple of weeks?

    Rachel Stroud, our GMM Registered Dietitian and Community Wellness Rep, has been joining host Rashan Ali to discuss some really important keys to weight-loss success. She will continue this series each week for the next few weeks, so make sure to tune in at 12:30 each Wednesday for some informed discussion (and a special FLASH SALE discount!!).

    photo 1

    Hopefully you’ve already made the pledge to yourself to Commit to Lean in 2014 and are on your way toward meeting your health goals this year. If you are, you know that the process of re-learning portion control and creating those engrained healthy habits takes a while.

    The complicated part is that so many diets out there make weight loss about less, less, less. Less calories, less food equals MORE WEIGHT LOSS.

    But for real weight loss that lasts, we need to replace the idea of “less” with the concept of balance and of sustainability. Repeat that to yourself: balance and sustainability. Balance and sustainability.

    rachel scary childhood meals

    Energy Balance is the simplest equation we have for achieving weight loss or weight maintenance. Our body takes in energy through food and beverages, and we put energy out through basic survival, activities of daily life, and planned exercise. If we want to lose weight, we have to put out more energy than we’re taking in.

    The calories you personally need each day for basic survival is called your Basil Metabolic Rate. It’s the number of calories your body need to function if you simply laid in bed all day. Those calories are the energy necessary for your heart to pump, your lungs to expand, and your lean muscles to be fueled.

    Now, IF, in the name of quick weight loss, you eat LESS than your body’s Basil Metabolic Rate, your body will enter “Starvation Mode.” Starvation mode changes the way the body processes nutrients so it stores our fat (gasp!) and breaks down muscle for the energy it needs instead.

    Now here’s the real kicker: fueling our muscles with oxygen and energy is a significant part of our metabolic rate, so let’s say your body breaks down muscle to fuel itself during your diet regimen of drastic calorie-cutting. In the process, you’ve lessened the amount of calories your body needs in a day. This means that instead of functioning at your normal (for example) 1700 calories necessary per day, your body has dropped and acclamated to functioning on (for example) 1000 calories per day.

    Now let’s say you go back to consuming the amount of calories you used to at your former Basil Metabolic Rate, or what you used to consider “normal” before severely cutting your calories. At that point it is going to be harder to continue to lose weight and to keep the weight you have lost off, because during the “starvation mode” period you have decreased your metabolism by decreasing your muscle mass.

    Make sense?

    The moral of the story is: the only way to increase your metabolism (so that you can actually burn away that FAT) is to build more muscle. This raises your metabolism and the amount of calories you burn in a day, despite your physical activity. Very low calorie diets shoot down your metabolism and cause you to lose muscle.

    Unless you want to continue cutting away calories and restricting your access to food for the rest of your life, losing weight the healthy and sustainable way means keeping your muscle and your metabolism and burning away your fat with a balance of nutrition and calorie intake that works for your exercise level and Basal Metabolic needs.

    Ever heard a weight loss plan tell you that you need to eat to lose weight? We just did.

    Tune in each week at 12:30 p.m. on Atlanta and Company to hear the discussion continue with Rachel and Rashan about healthy weight loss.

    And if you’re curious about how many calories YOU need per day, fill out your info in the Calorie Calculator tool at the bottom of the homepage of our website, or schedule a Med Gem appointment with one of our dietitians to find out your exact Basal Metabolic Rate!

    photo 7

  • 02Apr

    Today’s post is contributed by GMM Senior Vice President, Jess White.

    I’ll be the first to admit that I am not a writer. I can talk all day long, but when it comes to putting pen to paper, or rather fingers to the keyboard, I can’t ever seem to think of the right way to kick start the conversation!

    That being said, give me the opportunity to write about food, and I could pen a short novella in a matter of minutes.

    I should start off by dedicating this blog entry to the launch of our 2014 Spring/Summer Good Measure Meals Menu. In all honesty, it inspired me to write, to share, and to introduce you all to the things I love about our food. Yes, I may be a bit biased… after all, I live for this organization, our food and most of all, our mission to serve.

    If you’ve ever been to the Open Hand website, you’ll see our tagline front and center…“It’s About More.” Everything we do here has a deeper meaning, and so I thought I would share some of the new menu items and provide you with the insight behind why we’re excited to bring them to your table!

    Jess’ Top Three New GMM Dishes:

    1. Turkey Barley Stuffed Pepper- If you’ve ever been on our vegetarian meal plan, you might have had our lentil stuffed pepper, an old favorite of mine. This season, we’re introducing a new Healthy Selection version combining a lean ground turkey with barley, a grain that when consumed whole can help regulate blood sugar for up to 10 hours. As a bonus, barley contains 8 of the 13 essential amino acids! Not only is this is tastiest stuffed pepper that I have ever tasted, it will do your body good!

    peppers barley turkey stuffed pepp

    2. I didn’t think that I could possibly enjoy our Crab Cake lunch any more, but then our amazing menu development team decided to add in a fresh summertime salad to add some seasonal flare. Instead of your normal greens, we’re using Kale as our base, which is high in Vitamin A, C and K, and shown to be essential (along with other leafy greens) for preventing age-related macular degeneration. Tossed in a light vinaigrette and sprinkled with almonds and dried apricots, you have a tasty treat that is also easy on the eyes!

    almonds kale apricots

    3. Speaking of salads, our RD/Chefs put together another spring sensation, our New GMM Asian Chicken Salad with baby spinach, mandarin oranges, carrots, toasted almonds and a sesame vinaigrette. This salad is already a crowd pleaser. Not only is it packed full of taste and color, but it also contains Folate, vitamin C, K, and A. Add a little lean protein from the chicken and nuts, and you’ve got yourself a perfectly balanced meal that is simply scrum-diddily-YUMcious!

    chick salad up close

    Well, there you have it folks, a little behind-the-scenes tour of what to expect from the new Spring/Summer menu from Good Measure Meals. There are many more healthy and delectable entrees, so be sure to check out our menus online at www.goodmeasuremeals.com. Remember, you are the reason that we do what we do, so let us know what you like, what you want to see more of, and how we can continue to impress you!

    Bon appetit!

  • 27Mar

    Today’s post is contributed by GMM Community Nutrition Educator/Culinary Specialist, Ashley Van Cise.

    Adding a variety of color to my plate is one way that I keep myself on a healthy eating track. By choosing color, I know I’m eating an assortment of vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals.

    Pictured here are foods that I’ve made at home, highlighting some of my attempts to add color to my own plate. I’ve called out the phytochemicals that correlate to the color and the potential health benefits of each one.

    cherry tomato and basil pasta salad
    Cherry Tomato and Basil Pasta Salad – check out the bright red and yellow tomatoes. These tomatoes have concentrated amounts of lycopene which have been studied for their ability to protect against heart disease and cancer.

    blueberry oat
    Blueberry Oat Bran Muffins – focus your eye on the blueberries in these muffins. Their blue/purple color comes from a type of flavonoid called anthocyanins, which can act like antioxidants, reduce inflammation and combat against cancer cells.

    Black Bean Chili with Sweet Potatoes and Swiss Chard
    Black Bean Chili with Sweet Potatoes and Swiss Chard – Notice the orange going on here. Sweet potatoes are high in beta carotene which is a type of carotenoid that may protect against heart disease. The beans also contain flavonoids that can decrease inflammation and protect against heart disease, stroke and cancer.

    Roasted BBQ Chicken, Quinoa Pilaf and Arugula Salad with Radish and Carrots
    Roasted BBQ Chicken, Quinoa Pilaf and Arugula Salad with Radish and Carrots – There are a several healthy things going on in this picture. First, let me highlight the arugula which contains lutein, a type of carotenoid that can work to maintain healthy vision and protect eyes from cataracts and macular degeneration. Also notice the red radish, these contain anthocyanins, which I mentioned when discussing the blueberries found in the Oat Bran Muffins.

    Grilled Vegetables topped with Fresh Basil
    Grilled Vegetables topped with Fresh Basil – Check out those onions. Even though onions are white, they are high in a flavonoid called quercetin which works as an antioxidant to decrease inflammation and protect the body against heart disease, stroke and certain types of cancer.

    The way phytochemicals work and the optimum amounts for consuming are still being researched. Your goals should be to incorporate 5-9 servings of colorful fruits and veggies daily.

    What is the most colorful food on your plate today?

  • 27Aug

    Contributed by GMM Registered Dietitian, Laura Delfausse

    So I am a vegetarian.

    No, I don’t mind if you eat that Philly Cheesesteak in front of me; no, I don’t miss bacon; and yes, I get plenty of protein. I do own a juicer (though admittedly I’ve only used it twice), I try to buy organic when it is feasible, and…sometimes…I do wear leather shoes.  The point I am trying to make is that we like to affix labels to people based on our own lifestyle choices. And in my experience, some people fit these stereotypes to a “T,” but most of us do not, and so these labels can be very damaging.

    Take the vegetarian diet, for example. There are so many health benefits to meatless meals, but so many people hesitate to try vegetarianism because they are afraid of meat substitutes or because they think it is impossible to get all of the nutrients they need (even though many cultures have sustained themselves for a millennium on vegetarian diets!).

    GMM Vegetarian Pesto Garbanzo Bean Salad with Mixed Greens

    GMM Vegetarian Pesto Garbanzo Bean Salad with Mixed Greens

    I would never suggest that anyone go vegetarian unless they wanted to, but Americans as a general population eat way too much meat, and this is often because our portion sizes are way out of control.  Cutting back on meat consumption may not be such a bad idea after all.  John’s Hopkins University even started a ‘Meatless Mondays’ campaign with the simple concept of eliminating meat and high fat dairy products on Mondays only.  It’s a wellness-promoting campaign aimed at reducing the intake of saturated fats, which are the heart-clogging fats found mostly in animal products.  According to the University’s research, by cutting out meat and high-fat dairy products for just one day, a person can reduce their overall intake of saturated fats by 15-pecent! That’s a pretty significant amount, and considering heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S., this is something that we should all consider.

    Long story short, don’t be afraid to try a meatless meal every once in a while!  Especially with Good Measure Meals, which has a wide and delicious variety of vegetarian meals to keep newcomer, temporary, and even seasoned vegetarians excited and satisfied.

    GMM Lemongrass Tofu with Edamame Risotto and Ginger-glazed Carrots

    GMM Lemongrass Tofu with Edamame Risotto and Ginger-glazed Carrots

    Chances are even good that you already incorporate meatless meals into your diet from time to time, but this may not be a conscious decision on your part.  My recommendation is to step out of the box a little and make a conscious decision to reduce your saturated fat intake regularly.  You will probably even discover some new foods that you really like (GMM’s Thursday Quinoa Loaf dinner this week with Cheesy Whole Wheat Penne and a side of Green Beans, for instance) and that’s a win-win situation in my book!

  • 20Aug

    Today’s post is contributed by GMM Registered Dietitian, Laura Delfausse 

    Mayo1Anyone who knows me knows that my distaste for mayonnaise runs deep.

    Lucky for me, it is also not the healthiest condiment out there, so I feel no guilt avoiding it.  But I realize that for most people, this may be more of a sacrifice; because let’s be honest, if you grew up in the south, “salad” is something totally different than those green leafy concoctions you find at Ruby Tuesdays.

    True Southern salads are potato salad, chicken salad, broccoli salad, pasta salad, egg salad…am I right? And the list goes on . . . Long story short, we eat a lot of salads, and thus a lot of mayo.  And a lot of mayo means a lot of added fat.  All brands vary, but one tablespoon can pack in anywhere from 10-12 grams of fat.  Most people use at least twice that amount of mayo in their “salads!” That’s a lot of fat.

    So you might be asking yourself, why not use the low-fat or reduced fat varieties?  That’s fine, but realize that the fat in the mayo has to be replaced with something else. Most often it is replaced with sugars, like high fructose corn syrup.  In my opinion, replacing one unhealthy ingredient for another is not exactly the best solution.  Here are some better options:

    1. Use a vinaigrette, like mustard vinaigrette,Mayo2 on your tuna salad instead of mayo. This tangy addition not only incorporates more heart healthy fats (like olive oil), but the mustard can also cut the fishiness of the tuna.  This also works great on a potato salad! Have you tried Good Measure Meals’ Dijon Vinaigrette Potato Salad that we serve with our BBQ Chicken and Green Beans? It’s coming up for lunch on Monday, September 2, and it’s a real winner.
    2. Flavor your salads with pesto (especially good on pasta salad) – like the GMM Vegetarian Pesto Garbanzo Bean Salad over Fresh Mixed Greens!  When we think of pesto, we typically think of a mixture of basil, parmesan cheese, some spices and olive oil, but pesto can take on many different personalities.  There is sundried tomato pesto, sweet pea pesto, pumpkin seed pesto – the possibilities are endless and, like vinaigrettes, they encorporate heart healthy fats. As an added bonus, pesto has a little more of a gourmet feel to it, so if you are bringing your dish to a party, the guests will be quite impressed.
    3. Okay, so you don’t want to cut the mayo out completely? Try reducing it by replacing some of it with Greek yogurt.  At Good Measure Meals, we use Greek Yogurt to cut the fat in many of our spreads.  For instance, this week’s Cranberry Almond Chicken Salad has a Greek yogurt and mayonnaise base. This tasty compromise is sure to satisfy even the pickiest eaters.  Plus, Greek Yogurt is super high in protein and contains beneficial probiotics.
    4. Are you still craving the creamy, salty taste of mayo?  Try cottage cheese instead.  All you have to do is drain the cottage cheese overnight using cheese cloth, place the curds in a food processor and process until smooth.  Then, use the cottage cheese just how you would use regular mayonnaise, in salads or as a sandwich spread!

    So I have I convinced you to ditch the mayo yet? Sigh. Probably not, but I hope that I have at least encouraged you to diversify.  And all prejudices aside, you will really be doing your heart a favor (not to mention pleasing your mayo-hating friends).  Here’s to hoping the next BBQ I attend will have a little less mayo!

  • 26Feb

    Contributed by GMM Community Health Dietitian Laura Delfausse MS, RD, LD

     

    It is February, and whether you chose to participate in Valentine’s Day or not, there is no escaping the topic love and romance. Therefore, I thought an appropriate theme to discuss this month is relationships. Not the ones with your spouses or significant others, but the ones with your food.

    A good relationship is measured by an appropriate balance of give and take. What does this have to do with food you may ask? What can I give my food? The answer – respect. Respect your food for what it is and the awesome potential it has to heal and protect not only your body, but also your soul. If you respect your food it will repay you in more ways than you can measure. And much like the
    relationships in our personal lives, a healthy relationship with food takes constant work. Therefore, it is important to lay some groundwork, so that you will always know where the two of you stand. Here are 2 simple questions you can ask your food before digging in:

    1) Where is the love? One of the first things I ask myself before buying food is how much love was put into this item? If I don’t feel like it was appropriately nurtured, then for me that is a deal breaker.

    What do I mean by this? This answer is very personal, based on my own needs and ideals. Therefore, you are the only one who can answer to this question. Some of you may want to
    know if it was made in a factory or by hand. Others need to know the company’s motivation behind producing a particular product. And let’s be honest about his one, everyone needs to make money to survive. However, some go about the process more thoughtfully than others and, thus, put more love into their brand.

    The drive behind what we do at Good Measure Meals is you and it’s our community, which 100% of our proceeds support. We believe in health and wellness, and we’re implementing our beliefs through healthy meal plans and through support systems, because health and wellness extends beyond just the food you eat. Health and wellness is a lifestyle.

    Do your research and make sure the companies you patronize deserve you. Know where your food is coming from; research a company’s charitable pursuits and business model; take the time get to know your food. Don’t waste your time with superficial relationships, because you deserve more!

    2) Is this worth my time? In other words, what does your food bring to the table? Is it loaded with trans fats and empty calories, but “who cares because it tastes really good?” Or is it bland and unsatisfying, but really helping to keep those extra pounds away? Well here at Good Measure Meals, believe there is no justification for either scenario. The only meal worthy of your time includes
    both health and happiness. Without this balance, you are doomed to an unhealthy relationship with food.

    So, force yourself outside of your comfort zone once in a while. Don’t settle. Build your relationship with food on trust and mutual understanding, and you will be reap the rewards for many, many years to come. You will be amazed at what you will discover!

  • 19Nov

    Breakfast is an essential component of a balanced diet, and not only provides your body with the energy that you need to function throughout the morning, but also assists with weight management by jump starting your metabolism!  I will admit that I have always been a breakfast eater, but until I started on my Good Measure Meals™- I usually resorted to a grab and go item or a bowl of cereal if I had the time.  I knew that I should be eating a more nutrient dense morning meal, but who has the time to whip up and perfectly balance breakfast?

    I have GMM to thank for my new morning routine, that still manages to keep my mornings quick (I really do enjoy hitting the snooze button in the A.M.!) and provides me with the protein and energy to make it through the day!  In honor of breakfast, I wanted to write a quick blog post about one of my favorite breakfast entrees, the Pumpkin Oatmeal Breakfast Bar with Cranberries and Walnuts!  We all love the taste, but in GMM fashion, there is a lot of great nutrition that goes into the recipe, so I thought I would break down some of the ingredients for everyone, to show you why our culinary staff includes certain items in our menu!  Here it goes…

    Pumpkin: A naturally low fat and low calorie food, pumpkin is packed with disease fighting nutrients like alpha and beta-carotene, fiber, vitamins C & E, potassium and magnesium. The carotenes are converted into vitamin A once eaten and promote healthy vision immune response.  There is also evidence that pumpkin helps reverse skin damage caused by the sun and acts as an anti-inflammatory.  The Carotenoid properties of pumpkin also boost immunity and lessen the risk of heart disease!

    Oats: A great source of soluble fiber, oats have been proven to help lower “bad” cholesterol (LDL), boost “good” cholesterol(HDL), maintain a healthy circulatory system, and help prevent heart attacks!  Not only do they provide these heart healthy benefits, they are also jam packed with a wide range of vitamins and minerals including vitamins B and E, magnesium, iron and calcium!  They are also low on the glycemic index, so for folks managing insulin resistance, oats are a great addition to the diet!

    Cranberries: They may be small, but this tiny fruit is a powerhouse for health!  Cranberries are high in soluble fiber and protect against heart disease.  Because of their quinic acid content, they are one of the best treatments for urinary tract infections and help prevent digestive disorders and stomach ulcers

    Walnuts: Nuts are notorious for their high fat content, but walnuts are much richer in polyunsaturated fats than monounsaturated fats, boasting an unusually high content of omega-3 fatty acid.  This makeup proves walnuts to be helpful in the prevention of heart disease, cancers, arthritis, skin problems and disorders of the nervous system.  There’s more too!  Walnuts have been should to lower “bad” cholesterol and blood pressure, while increasing the elasticity of the arteries!

    Cinnamon: Did you know that cinnamon has an anticoagulant compound (cinnamaldehyde) that can help protect against strokes?  It is also an anti-inflammatory, shown to relieve symptoms of arthritis and asthma…hard to believe, right?  The benefits don’t stop there though, cinnamon also functions as a digestive aid- relieving bloating and flatulence, and reducing heartburn… maybe that’s why it is so abundant in the holiday feasts!

    Now that you know some of the health benefits of this morning treat, get excited about Monday morning, because your GMM breakfast kicks off the week with our very own Pumpkin Oatmeal Breakfast Bar goodness!

    What’s your favorite Good Measure Meal™ Breakfast?