• 28Oct

    Today’s post was contributed by Alissa Palladino, RD, LD.

    fall veggies header

    It has been unseasonably warm the last week or so, but it looks like the weather finally decided to take a turn for the Fall-ish yesterday. If this cooler weather and the shorter and shorter days have you craving hearty, savory dishes then you’re in luck – the dark orange and green veggies in season now are perfect for creating warm and satisfying meals all season long. (Recipes at the end!)

    Butternut Squash: Just one of several squash varieties in season in the fall, butternut squash is high in fiber, potassium, magnesium, and vitamins A and C. With its bright orange color, butternut squash helps protect your eyes and can sub for pumpkin in recipes. For best quality, look for squash that’s heavy for its size and store it in a cool dark place for up to a month. Try it steamed and drizzled with olive oil, cubed and roasted, or mashed like potatoes. Make it sweet by seasoning with cinnamon, nuts and raisins.

    Sweet potatoes: Higher in vitamins A and C than their white counterparts, sweet potatoes can be enjoyed in a variety of ways. Like other orange vegetables, sweet potatoes promote eye health and are high in fiber, potassium, and vitamins A and C. Choose firm, small to medium sized potatoes without blemishes or soft spots, store them in cool dark place and use within 3-5 weeks. Enjoy them baked, mashed, cubed and roasted, or –my personal favorite- cut them into wedges and make sweet potato fries! (See recipe below)

    punkinsPumpkin: The benefits and uses of pumpkin go far beyond their best-known role as jack-o-lanterns at Halloween. Like other orange vegetables, they are a good source of vitamin C and an excellent source of vitamin A. Select pumpkins that are firm and heavy for their size, and store in a cool dry place for up to two months. Try toasting the seeds with a little olive oil and salt for a savory snack– make them sweet by adding cinnamon and brown sugar, or spicy with a bit of cayenne paper. Enjoy the “meat” of the pumpkin by roasting or sautéing it diced, along with diced squash and/or sweet potato. For healthier baked goods, try subbing canned or pureed pumpkin for some of the fat in your favorite brownie or muffin recipe. Pureed pumpkin is also great in soups and parfaits.

    swiss chardSwiss Chard: A dark leafy green that often has colorful stems, Swiss Chard is high in magnesium and vitamins A and C. Choose chard with fresh green leaves and store unwashed in the crisper for 2 to 3 days. Delicious sautéed with olive oil and garlic, it’s also a great way to pack some extra nutrition into smoothies. Try adding it to soups and stews, layering it in lasagnas, subbing it for spinach in omelets and quiches, or steaming the stalks and eating them like asparagus.

    Brussels Sprouts: These cruciferous vegetables get a bad rep, but Brussels sprouts can actually be delicious when prepared right, not to mention low in calories and packed full of nutrients, such as fiber, vitamin C and folate. When shopping, look for firm, bright green sprout heads, and keep them refrigerated in a plastic bag for up to a week. My favorite way to enjoy Brussels sprouts is to cut them in halves, toss in olive oil and roast until they are brown and crispy, bringing out their natural sweetness (see recipe below). Parmesan cheese and balsamic vinegar complement their flavor nicely. You can also steam them, boil them, add them to stir-fries, or try them shaved in a cold salad.

    sweet potato friesSweet Potato “Fries”
    1. Pre-heat oven to 450° F
    2. Peel sweet potatoes (if desired) and slice into wedges or strips.
    3. Coat with olive oil and spread on sheet pan.
    4. Sprinkle with salt, pepper and any other herbs or spices you enjoy. Try cinnamon and nutmeg for a sweet dish, or paprika and chili powder for a spicy kick. (Or rosemary, garlic powder, Cajun seasoning… the possibilities are endless!)
    5. Roast until potatoes start to brown and are slightly crispy, about 20-30 minutes, turning half-way through.
    6. Remove from heat and enjoy!

    roasted brusselsOven-Roasted Brussels Sprouts
    1. Pre-heat oven to 400° F
    2. Rinse and pat dry Brussels sprout heads. Trim ends and chop into halves.
    3. Toss in olive oil (or use spritzer) and spread on rimmed sheet pan.
    4. Roast sprouts until they turn golden brown and crispy (about 25-30 minutes), tossing half-way through.
    5. Remove from heat and sprinkle with salt and pepper.
    This recipe is delicious on its own, but there are many variations to explore to add flavor, texture and color! Try sprinkling Parmesan cheese, drizzling balsamic vinegar reduction, adding herbs and spices, such rosemary, or mixing in nuts and dried fruits (pecans and cranberries work great.)

  • 09Oct

    Today’s post was contributed by Alissa Palladino, RD, LD.

    notes from the kitchen

    The signs of fall are undeniable, from the cooler weather and leaves changing colors to pumpkin-flavored versions of just about everything! Good Measure Meals is marking the change of seasons by launching its fall/winter menu. You’ll still find many of your favorite meals, with the addition of seasonal vegetables and fall-inspired flavors. Here’s the inside scoop on some of our new items for autumn.

    It’s all about orange vegetables this season. High in vitamins A and C, fiber and potassium, nutritional powerhouses like butternut squash and sweet potatoes will help protect your eyes, support your immune system, regulate blood sugar and cholesterol levels, and promote heart health. Plus, beta-carotene, the pro-vitamin A pigment that gives these veggies their bright orange color, is a powerful antioxidant.

    You’ll find roasted butternut squash and oven roasted sweet potatoes on our fall/winter menu as tasty and nutritious side dishes at lunch and dinner. They also make appearances as main dishes in creamy Butternut Squash Ravioli and a returning favorite, Sweet Potato Spinach Burgers.
    sweet potatoes

    squash2

    Another seasonal vegetable to look for this fall are Brussels sprouts. Packed with fiber, vitamin C and folate, these cruciferous vegetables don’t deserve their bad rep! They’re delicious roasted, which is exactly how you’ll find them as a savory side dish to our lunch and dinner meals.

    brussels1
    Some breakfast staples also get a fresh fall makeover with the addition of cranberries, in season during Fall/Winter. From orange cranberry scones to cranberry maple sauce for dipping French toast sticks, you’ll get a perfect balance of sweet and tart flavors and a good source of vitamin C and fiber to power up your morning.
    cran2

    cran3
    Start the season off right and enjoy the fresh favors of fall with Good Measure Meals!

  • 21Aug

    Today’s guest article is contributed by Open Hand Atlanta/Good Measure Meals intern, Claudia Utesch. Claudia is a senior in the Didactic program at Georgia State University. She currently holds the position as student gardener in the Nutrition Student Network at State and works as a supervisor at the Georgia State Recreation Center.

    Often when people think of farmer’s markets, they think of springtime. Fresh produce and new growth after dormant winters, and all.

    But, weather pending, high season for farmer’s markets is actually during July/August, when produce is catapulting from the ground in epic proportions after weeks of careful planning, growing, and harvesting. Maybe you haven’t been to a farmer’s market yet in 2014, maybe you haven’t been since the spring, or maybe there are ones you haven’t tried out yet. Either way, the time is now to hit the markets – especially if you only use Good Measure Meals for 1 or 2 meals per day!

    However, while farmer’s markets are new and exciting places to shop for ingredients, they can also be a little daunting. There is a variety of produce available to shoppers, but where to start and what to buy can leave a shopper discouraged. Follow these steps to make your late summer trip to the farmer’s market a success.

    Know what is in Season
    Before heading to the farmer’s market, understand which fruits and vegetables are in season. Since most the produce is local, the season will strongly impact what you see as you search for ingredients. Here is a link that shows which months will bring specific fruits and vegetables.

    farmersmarketunionFind a Location near You
    Don’t know where to find a farmer’s market? It can be challenging to find one you enjoy that is close by. Luckily, the Atlanta area has many options, and there are a couple websites that can direct you to the closest one. Try out a couple different locations to get a feel of what you like in a farmer’s market. Here is a link of some markets in your area.

    Plan Ahead
    Go with recipes in mind. Since farmer’s markets are not laid out like grocery stores, it can be difficult to know exactly what you need. Try to find recipes that include a lot of produce and make sure to stock up. There are a variety of fruits and vegetables so try and get all you or your family needs for the week. If you are in need of ideas, try tomato basil skewers as healthy snacks for your next summer BBQ.
    **Tip: At farm stand farmers markets with farmers present, ask the farmer how best to store the produce you purchase for maximum/prolonged freshness. Not everything needs to go in the refrigerator, and many things should be stored specifically in plastic or paper. Your farmer should have good tips so that your food doesn’t spoil before you get to it.**

    Try Something Different
    Have you ever gone to the store and noticed a fruit or vegetable that you are not familiar with? Unknown produce often looks way more complicated than it actually is, and it can seem daunting as a waste of precious time in the kitchen compared to tried and true recipes. But trying a new vegetable or fruit could ultimately open up your list of recipes and mealtime variety, not to mention your taste buds. Start by picking up one different fruit or vegetable, and incorporate it into your salad, sandwich, stir-fry, veggie roast, etc. You never know until you try it! Here are some examples of exotic produce worth testing in your home kitchen: tomatillo, star fruit, young coconuts, Dragon Fruit, Kumquat, or even a Pummelo.

    farmers market 1Ask the Farmer
    If you are unsure about what an item is or how to cook it, do not be afraid to ask the seller. Farmer’s markets can have a lot of local farmers who are happy to show people how to use their products in the tastiest ways possible. Asking for new recipes or ways to cook produce can be an exciting activity for you and the family!

  • 26Jun

    Today’s post in the series “What are your Favorite Summer Fruits and Veggies?” was contributed by David Rogers.

    Summer-eating season is one of my favorite times of the year! Living in suburban Atlanta, I have a wealth of fresh local produce (including my own and my neighbors’ gardens) to choose from.

    This season’s recipes and fare are lighter and easier to prepare, and are on the menu as much as possible at my house.

    Since my family stays pretty active outdoors during the longer daylight hours, there are a few go-to items that I keep handy in my own kitchen for quick preparation: tomatoes, fresh basil and mozzarella, cilantro, garlic and nuts are the types of ingredients we like to eat on a regular basis. These can be prepared in simple, hearty meals with little-to-no prep time.

    farm fresh veggiesOne of my all-time favorites is a Beefsteak or Big Boy tomato. Slice up one of these and pair it with light mayo, Greek yogurt, or just enjoy it as a plain tomato sandwich, and you’ll have a wonderful picnic meal or after-swim snack! Make the tomato into a fresh summer salad by pairing it with fresh basil, spinach or mixed greens, parmesan cheese, and your favorite nut like almonds, walnuts, or pecans. Nuts like thsese are packed with nutritional value and help balance out the meal. I like to dress a salad like this with a homemade balsamic vinaigrette, a light dressing that brings out the fresh, natural flavors of the salad.

    I also like to serve easy tapas like these Pesto-Stuffed Peppers. They are a perfect complement to a salad or to something fresh from the grill like veggies, chicken, beef or fish.

    I hope you enjoy your summer eating, and remember to keep it simple and fresh!

    Fresh Pesto
    Ingredients
    • 2 cups fresh cilantro
    • 2 small garlic cloves
    • 3/4 cup toasted walnuts
    • Small pinch of sea salt
    • 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese
    • 1 cup olive oil
    • 1/3 cup fresh orange juice

    Instructions
    Put all of the above ingredients in a blender or a food processor and puree.

    Pesto-stuffed Peppers

    Pesto-stuffed Peppers

    Pesto-Stuffed Peppers
    Ingredients
    • Pesto (see recipe above)
    • 30 red, yellow, orange Sweet Mini Peppers
    • 18 ounces cream cheese or goat cheese

    Instructions
    Preheat oven to 350. Leaving stem on the peppers, slice peppers and remove the seeds. Fill each pepper with cheese. Arrange peppers on a baking sheet, drizzle with a touch of olive oil and bake for about 8-10 minutes until peppers are tender and a touch crispy. Remove from oven and arrange on a platter & spoon pesto on top of each pepper. Save left over pesto — it’s great on grilled chicken or warm veggies!
    Balsamic Dressing
    Ingredients
    • 1/4 cup olive oil
    • 1/4 cup balsamic vinegar
    • Italian spice blend to taste

    Instructions
    Mix ingredients in cruet. Shake and enjoy!

  • 05Jun

    Today’s blog post in our series “What are your favorite Summer fruits and Veggies?” was contributed by Rachel Stroud, Good Measure Meals Community Wellness Rep, RD, LD

    Headshot_RStroud_2013I like being that dietitian who breaks the “rules.” The one that tells you things are okay that everyone around you is shouting “DO NOT EAT.”

    Here’s why: I love food. When I have to choose, I love food more than nutrition. But the fact is: I rarely have to choose. Food is wonderful. Calories are glorious little morsels of energy that fuel our bodies to do all the things we love to do. They’re not the enemy, they’re not to be avoided – they’re to be enjoyed, and chosen wisely.

    So here’s the food I want to talk about today: Corn.

    People LOVE to hate on corn.

    “It’s SOOOOOO starchy”
    “You feed your kids WHAT?!”
    “Corn is soooo not a vegetable”

    Let’s all take a step back for a minute. Corn is a vegetable, agriculturally speaking. Nutritionally, a medium ear of corn has ¼ the sugar of an apple and ¾ of the total carbohydrates. Corn is a good source of fiber, and provides us with a solid helping of thiamin, niacin, and folate, all tasty B vitamins.

    Yes folks, it does have a higher carb count than leafy greens, but eat it instead of your roll with dinner and you have a glorious, nutritious side dish. Corn should not take the place of your leafy greens, or other non-starchy veggies, but it certainly deserves a chance in place of a grain or bread, on occasion. Especially this time of year, when the ears are falling heavy off of their stalks and all 800 kernels/ear are puffed full of their sugary, creamy, white juice.

    Summer's fruits, veggies, and herbs make for delicious recipes!

    Summer’s fruits, veggies, and herbs make for delicious recipes!

    You know what else I love about corn? You can eat it raw. Enough of those shallow pans of boiling water that ultimately burn my fingers while I try to spin the corn so that each side gets cooked (but not TOO cooked!!). Enough of that.
    Cold, raw, sweet, fresh corn is one of the greatest parts of summer. Just slice it off the cob, and you’re in business.

    Here is one of my favorite recipes:
    2 cups raw, fresh, sweet Corn (3-4 ears)
    1 cup halved cherry tomatoes
    ½ c Fresh Mozzarella (preferably in ½ in cubes)
    ¼ c chopped basil
    1 T Olive Oil
    2T White Balsamic Vinegar
    salt and pepper to taste

    Get ready to take away the emptiest bowl after your next dinner party.

    P.S. Next time, we’ll talk about potatoes.

  • 02Apr

    Today’s post is contributed by GMM Senior Vice President, Jess White.

    I’ll be the first to admit that I am not a writer. I can talk all day long, but when it comes to putting pen to paper, or rather fingers to the keyboard, I can’t ever seem to think of the right way to kick start the conversation!

    That being said, give me the opportunity to write about food, and I could pen a short novella in a matter of minutes.

    I should start off by dedicating this blog entry to the launch of our 2014 Spring/Summer Good Measure Meals Menu. In all honesty, it inspired me to write, to share, and to introduce you all to the things I love about our food. Yes, I may be a bit biased… after all, I live for this organization, our food and most of all, our mission to serve.

    If you’ve ever been to the Open Hand website, you’ll see our tagline front and center…“It’s About More.” Everything we do here has a deeper meaning, and so I thought I would share some of the new menu items and provide you with the insight behind why we’re excited to bring them to your table!

    Jess’ Top Three New GMM Dishes:

    1. Turkey Barley Stuffed Pepper- If you’ve ever been on our vegetarian meal plan, you might have had our lentil stuffed pepper, an old favorite of mine. This season, we’re introducing a new Healthy Selection version combining a lean ground turkey with barley, a grain that when consumed whole can help regulate blood sugar for up to 10 hours. As a bonus, barley contains 8 of the 13 essential amino acids! Not only is this is tastiest stuffed pepper that I have ever tasted, it will do your body good!

    peppers barley turkey stuffed pepp

    2. I didn’t think that I could possibly enjoy our Crab Cake lunch any more, but then our amazing menu development team decided to add in a fresh summertime salad to add some seasonal flare. Instead of your normal greens, we’re using Kale as our base, which is high in Vitamin A, C and K, and shown to be essential (along with other leafy greens) for preventing age-related macular degeneration. Tossed in a light vinaigrette and sprinkled with almonds and dried apricots, you have a tasty treat that is also easy on the eyes!

    almonds kale apricots

    3. Speaking of salads, our RD/Chefs put together another spring sensation, our New GMM Asian Chicken Salad with baby spinach, mandarin oranges, carrots, toasted almonds and a sesame vinaigrette. This salad is already a crowd pleaser. Not only is it packed full of taste and color, but it also contains Folate, vitamin C, K, and A. Add a little lean protein from the chicken and nuts, and you’ve got yourself a perfectly balanced meal that is simply scrum-diddily-YUMcious!

    chick salad up close

    Well, there you have it folks, a little behind-the-scenes tour of what to expect from the new Spring/Summer menu from Good Measure Meals. There are many more healthy and delectable entrees, so be sure to check out our menus online at www.goodmeasuremeals.com. Remember, you are the reason that we do what we do, so let us know what you like, what you want to see more of, and how we can continue to impress you!

    Bon appetit!

  • 27Mar

    Today’s post is contributed by GMM Community Nutrition Educator/Culinary Specialist, Ashley Van Cise.

    Adding a variety of color to my plate is one way that I keep myself on a healthy eating track. By choosing color, I know I’m eating an assortment of vitamins, minerals and phytochemicals.

    Pictured here are foods that I’ve made at home, highlighting some of my attempts to add color to my own plate. I’ve called out the phytochemicals that correlate to the color and the potential health benefits of each one.

    cherry tomato and basil pasta salad
    Cherry Tomato and Basil Pasta Salad – check out the bright red and yellow tomatoes. These tomatoes have concentrated amounts of lycopene which have been studied for their ability to protect against heart disease and cancer.

    blueberry oat
    Blueberry Oat Bran Muffins – focus your eye on the blueberries in these muffins. Their blue/purple color comes from a type of flavonoid called anthocyanins, which can act like antioxidants, reduce inflammation and combat against cancer cells.

    Black Bean Chili with Sweet Potatoes and Swiss Chard
    Black Bean Chili with Sweet Potatoes and Swiss Chard – Notice the orange going on here. Sweet potatoes are high in beta carotene which is a type of carotenoid that may protect against heart disease. The beans also contain flavonoids that can decrease inflammation and protect against heart disease, stroke and cancer.

    Roasted BBQ Chicken, Quinoa Pilaf and Arugula Salad with Radish and Carrots
    Roasted BBQ Chicken, Quinoa Pilaf and Arugula Salad with Radish and Carrots – There are a several healthy things going on in this picture. First, let me highlight the arugula which contains lutein, a type of carotenoid that can work to maintain healthy vision and protect eyes from cataracts and macular degeneration. Also notice the red radish, these contain anthocyanins, which I mentioned when discussing the blueberries found in the Oat Bran Muffins.

    Grilled Vegetables topped with Fresh Basil
    Grilled Vegetables topped with Fresh Basil – Check out those onions. Even though onions are white, they are high in a flavonoid called quercetin which works as an antioxidant to decrease inflammation and protect the body against heart disease, stroke and certain types of cancer.

    The way phytochemicals work and the optimum amounts for consuming are still being researched. Your goals should be to incorporate 5-9 servings of colorful fruits and veggies daily.

    What is the most colorful food on your plate today?

  • 20Mar

    Today’s post is contributed by GMM Marketing and Tradeshow Coordinator, Camille Johnson

    Let’s face it. Most of us are creatures of habit.

    I plead the fifth.

    I happen to be one of those people who doesn’t mind eating the same lunch five days in a row. When you find healthy recipes that are affordable to make and don’t take much time, it’s easy to repeat!

    But working at Good Measure Meals has allowed me the opportunity to try different types of food while simultaneously eliminating that “intimidating factor” attached to some health-promoting foods.

    One of those amazing discoveries is Farro, a hearty ancient grain with a nutty flavor.

    After I tried Farro on GMM’s menu, I decided I wanted to try and cook it on my own. I bought some of my favorite chicken stock (I always purchase reduced sodium), a bundle of kale, fresh garlic, & a huge onion.

    After cooking the Farro in the chicken stock and then sautéing the kale, onion, and garlic separately (using Extra Virgin Olive Oil), I thought “why not combine these together?” I’m glad I did! It was delicious, and it has even become one of my meals of habit lately, since it’s easy and satisfying.

    GMM isn’t only a great tool for weight-loss or convenience, but also a great way to inspire people to put on that apron and try something new!

    What new foods have you incorporated into your cooking routine lately? Share in the comments, and let’s inspire each other!

    Kale Farro Salad

    photo via a similar recipe on Bon Apetit Magazine

  • 03Dec

    Today’s post is contributed by GMM Registered Dietitian and Community Wellness Representative, Rachel Stroud

    Raise your hand if you hated Brussels sprouts as a kid.  How bout still as an adult?  You and the majority of adults everywhere!

    FallBrussWhat if the answer to liking Brussels sprouts was simple?  What if the world of delicious, colorful, tasty veggies could be open to you once again with just a few simple cooking tips?  Yes, it could be that easy.

    I can’t tell you how many people snarl and scrunch up their face when I suggest that more vegetables could be the key to accomplishing their health goals.  Instantly they see visions of mushy, olive green, overcooked side dishes, and feel the emotion of being forced to stay at the table until the dreaded [fill in your most hated vegetable] were gone.

    Most people are convinced they still dislike certain vegetables, even when they haven’t tried them since childhood.  Would you believe that your taste preferences may surprise you?  Like all other cells, tastebuds regenerate over time.  They change with age and the influence of the other foods we eat.  Believe it or not, you can train yourself to like things over time, especially when you recognize the positive benefits you get from these healthier choices.  Research shows us that it takes 20 times of trying something to develop a taste for it.  Sometimes even longer!  As you make choices toward healthy behaviors, you may be surprised at how your preferences follow.

    Other times, our preferences are influenced by our cooking methods.  This is the easiest fix!  If you’re boiling Brussels sprouts, no matter what you add, they’re still going to taste like mushy. boiled. Brussels sprouts.  If you grew up eating overcooked green beans, broccoli, or asparagus, you were justified in disliking them!

    Take some cues from GMM and let us teach you a couple of our favorite veggies cooking methods.

    st pattys broccoli1) Roasting – Roasting is when a food is exposed to dry heat over a prolonged period of time.  **This is my favorite way to cook any and all veggies.** Roasted carrots, asparagus, green beans, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, you name it.

    Toss them lightly in olive oil and leave them in a 400-degree oven until they can be poked through with a fork.  Roasting initiates a caramelization process in veggies that pulls out their natural sugars, making them instantly sweeter and less bitter.  Have you tried roasted peppers vs raw?  Roasted potatoes vs boiled?  Roasted or caramelized onions? Have you noticed the sweetness that comes out after they’ve been roasted?  That’s why roasting is my favorite.  Just wait until you try GMM’s roasted Brussels sprouts. They’ll make lovers out of any hater.

    steamed-carrots2) Steaming – Steaming gives us the cooked, softened texture we like without stripping the veggies of their nutrients or natural moisture, like boiling typically does.  Steam your veggies with a steamer basket on the stovetop for 8-10 minutes, or by putting an inch of water into a medium sized bowl along with the veggies, and microwave for 2-3 minutes.  The process of steaming helps to breakdown the toughness of raw vegetables but maintain a significant part of the moisture.  It gives you control to cook them as much as you like, while preserving color and nutrients, whether you like them softer or more al dente.  Once steamed you can toss them in a little salt, or lightly sprinkle parmesan cheese over the top, like we do at GMM with our green beans or broccoli.

    Alright…now who’s willing to give veggies another shot?  New taste buds, new cooking methods, and almost a new year! 

     

    To learn more about re-doing your veggies, watch Rachel on Atlanta & Company tomorrow morning (12/4) at 11am!

  • 27Aug

    Contributed by GMM Registered Dietitian, Laura Delfausse

    So I am a vegetarian.

    No, I don’t mind if you eat that Philly Cheesesteak in front of me; no, I don’t miss bacon; and yes, I get plenty of protein. I do own a juicer (though admittedly I’ve only used it twice), I try to buy organic when it is feasible, and…sometimes…I do wear leather shoes.  The point I am trying to make is that we like to affix labels to people based on our own lifestyle choices. And in my experience, some people fit these stereotypes to a “T,” but most of us do not, and so these labels can be very damaging.

    Take the vegetarian diet, for example. There are so many health benefits to meatless meals, but so many people hesitate to try vegetarianism because they are afraid of meat substitutes or because they think it is impossible to get all of the nutrients they need (even though many cultures have sustained themselves for a millennium on vegetarian diets!).

    GMM Vegetarian Pesto Garbanzo Bean Salad with Mixed Greens

    GMM Vegetarian Pesto Garbanzo Bean Salad with Mixed Greens

    I would never suggest that anyone go vegetarian unless they wanted to, but Americans as a general population eat way too much meat, and this is often because our portion sizes are way out of control.  Cutting back on meat consumption may not be such a bad idea after all.  John’s Hopkins University even started a ‘Meatless Mondays’ campaign with the simple concept of eliminating meat and high fat dairy products on Mondays only.  It’s a wellness-promoting campaign aimed at reducing the intake of saturated fats, which are the heart-clogging fats found mostly in animal products.  According to the University’s research, by cutting out meat and high-fat dairy products for just one day, a person can reduce their overall intake of saturated fats by 15-pecent! That’s a pretty significant amount, and considering heart disease is the number one killer in the U.S., this is something that we should all consider.

    Long story short, don’t be afraid to try a meatless meal every once in a while!  Especially with Good Measure Meals, which has a wide and delicious variety of vegetarian meals to keep newcomer, temporary, and even seasoned vegetarians excited and satisfied.

    GMM Lemongrass Tofu with Edamame Risotto and Ginger-glazed Carrots

    GMM Lemongrass Tofu with Edamame Risotto and Ginger-glazed Carrots

    Chances are even good that you already incorporate meatless meals into your diet from time to time, but this may not be a conscious decision on your part.  My recommendation is to step out of the box a little and make a conscious decision to reduce your saturated fat intake regularly.  You will probably even discover some new foods that you really like (GMM’s Thursday Quinoa Loaf dinner this week with Cheesy Whole Wheat Penne and a side of Green Beans, for instance) and that’s a win-win situation in my book!